New 5×7 Photo: Image of New Stars by Hubble Space Telescope

New borderless print measures 5″ x 7″ (approximate). Our prints are custom made-to-order using a gloss finish on heavy-weight photographic paper. Print is also coated for water-resistance and acid free to prevent yellowing. **A Note on Image Quality: The quality of historic images are subject to the wearing of time, the capabilities of the original photographer, and limitations of period technology. History affords us no re-takes; we must content ourselves with what has been left to us. Please note that we do not attempt to fix, enhance or disturb the original image in any way, as we feel these eccentricities add to its historic charm. Thank you for taking this into consideration before making your purchase.

Product Features

  • Title – Image of New Stars by Hubble Space Telescope
  • Description Source – NASA
  • Year – 9/24/1997
  • SKU – NAS-0178
  • Description – NASA Hubble Space Telescope “family portrait” of young, ultra-bright stars nested in their embryonic cloud of glowing gases. The celestial maternity ward, called N81, is located 200,000 light-years away in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), a small irregular satellite galaxy of our Milky Way. Hubble’s exquisite resolution allows astronomers to pinpoint 50 separate stars tightly packed in the nebula’s core within a 10 light- year diameter – slightly more than twice the distance between earth and the nearest star to our sun. The closest pair of stars is only 1/3 of a light-year apart (0.3 arcseconds in the sky). This furious rate of mass loss from these super-hot stars is evident in the Hubble picture that reveals dramatic shapes sculpted in the nebula’s wall of glowing gases by violent stellar winds and shock waves. A pair of bright stars in the center of the nebula is pouring out most of the ultraviolet radiation to make the nebula glow. Just above them, a small dark knot is all that is left of the cold cloud of molecular hydrogen and dust the stars were born from. Dark absorption lanes of residual dust trisect the nebula. The nebula offers a unique opportunity for a close-up glimpse at the firestorm’ accompanying the birth of extremely massive stars, each blazing with the brilliance of 300,000 of our suns. Such galactic fireworks were much more common billions of years ago in the early universe, when most star formation took place.

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